CHEMICAL PEELS

manostaxx3

http://www.manostaxx.com

Also called chemexfoliation, derma peeling

Do you wish that you could simply peel signs of aging from your skin? Dermatologists use chemical peels to do just this. A chemical peel can diminish many signs of aging on the face as well as the hands, neck, and chest.

Chemical peels also treat some skin conditions. Dermatologists use chemical peels to treat some types of acne and conditions that discolor the skin.

Whether you receive a chemical peel to diminish signs of aging or treat a skin condition, you can see:

  • Fewer lines and wrinkles.
  • More even skin color.
  • Brighter complexion.
  • Smoother skin.

 

Some chemical peels require downtime.             

Uses: Dermatologists use chemical peels to treat:

  • Acne (some types).
  • Age spots.
  • Discoloration (blotchy complexion, uneven skin tone).
  • Dull complexion.
  • Fine lines (especially under the eyes and around the mouth).
  • Freckles.
  • Melasma.
  • Rough-feeling skin.
  • Sun-damage skin.

 

Insurance coverage: Chemical peels are considered a cosmetic treatment. Insurance does not cover the cost of cosmetic treatments.

To protect your health and find out what results you want, a dermatologist always offers a consultation before performing a chemical peel. To help you get the most benefit from this consultation, dermatologists recommends that you:

  • Ask questions.
  • Gather important information before your consultation.

 

This page tells you what to ask and what information to gather.

Questions to ask before getting a chemical peel

You should ask the following questions before getting a chemical peel:

  • Will a board-certified dermatologist perform the chemical peel?
  • How many chemical peels has the doctor performed on people with my skin coloring?
  • What will I need to do before and after the peel to get the best results?
  • What results can I expect?
  • What are the potential side effects?
  • Do I have a higher risk for any complications?
  • Will I have downtime?
  • May I see before-and-after photos or speak with patients you treated with a chemical peel?
  • How much will the treatment cost?

 

During the consultation, your dermatologist also can tell you whether another treatment would be a better option for you. You may find that your dermatologist recommends using more than one treatment. Results from many research studies show that combining treatments can lead to better, longer-lasting results.

Information to tell your dermatologist before getting a chemical peel

Before you get a chemical peel, be sure to tell your dermatologist the following information:

  • If you are taking or have ever taken isotretinoin, a medicine prescribed for severe acne.
  • All other medicines you take — or have recently taken. Be sure your dermatologist knows about antibiotics, acne medicines, and medicines that you buy without a prescription, such as aspirin.
  • If you frequently get cold sores or have had cold sores in the past.
  • If your skin scars easily.
  • All herbs, vitamins, and minerals you take. Even if you haven’t taken these for a while, be sure to mention them.
  • All surgeries and cosmetic treatments you have had. While some patients feel embarrassed talking about this, the information you share can make a difference in the results you see. Don’t omit anything — even if it seems unimportant.

Continue at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/cosmetic-treatments/chemical-peels#preparation

The text above is owned by the site above referred.

Here is only a small part of the article, for more please follow the link

Also see:

https://dadoswebaxx.weebly.com/

DadosWebaxx

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s